Digital Week

Blu-rays of the Week Get Out (Universal) After nearly $200 million and near-universal critical praise, Jordan Peele’s writing-directing debut can’t hope to live up to such excessive audience and reviewer ...

Blu-rays of the Week The Accidental Tourist (Warner Archive) One of Anne Tyler’s most satisfying novels—about an emotionally distant travel writer reeling from his young son’s death and grieving wife’s ...

Blu-rays of the Week Brain Damage (Arrow) Frank Henenlotter’s grubby 1988 gorefest introduces a brain-eating parasite named Edgar who finds a willing young idiot to do his murderous bidding: this ...

Blu-rays of the Week I Am Not Your Negro (Magnolia) Remember This House, a book James Baldwin never finished, survives in manuscript form and is a personal reminiscence of three ...

Blu-rays of the Week Caltiki—The Immortal Monster / Django Prepare a Coffin (Arrow) Even by paltry B-movie standards, Caltiki—a 1969 monster movie about an ancient Mayan god who goes on ...

Blu-rays of the Week L’Assassino (Arrow Academy) Elio Petri’s 1960 debut has its muddy moments, but its cracklingly alive story of a businessman who may have killed his rich mistress ...

The Bye Bye Man (Universal) This hopelessly confused attempt at a psychological haunted-house flick has flat acting—including stalwarts Faye Dunaway and Carrie-Anne Moss—a hollow script and contempt for an audience ...

Blu-rays of the Week Ascent to Hell (Gravitas Ventures) This grisly ghost story takes place in a vacant NYC building that houses the disturbed specters of those killed in a ...

Blu-rays of the Week Blow-Up (Criterion) In 1966, Michelangelo Antonioni went to swinging London to make his first English-language film, a rare instance of the cultural zeitgeist being recorded, aside ...

Blu-rays of the Week Collateral Beauty (Warner Bros) Will Smith’s least memorable movies are always far too heavy on the sanctimony: like the execrable Seven Pounds, his new movie piles ...

Blu-rays of the Week All We Had (Gravitas) Katie Holmes’s directorial debut is an earnest, feel-good study of a single mom and her teenage daughter who teeter on the edge ...

Blu-rays of the Week The Boyfriend (Warner Archive) One of Ken Russell’s most atypical films, his 1971 version of Sandy Wilson’s old-fashioned musical still contains the director’s often uncontrolled frenzy ...

Blu-rays of the Week Brahms—German Requiem (Clasart Classic) Perhaps the most emotionally charged of the famous Requiems (Mozart, Verdi, Faure, Britten), Johannes Brahms’ German Requiem is often trotted out for ...

Blu-rays of the Week Betty/L’Enfer/The Swindle (Cohen Film Collection) These features by French director Claude Chabrol—who, at his best, could compete with Alfred Hitchcock for witty, well-turned suspense films—are variable ...

Blu-rays of the Week Cameraperson (Criterion) Kirsten Johnson has shot many seminal images over the past few decades, and Cameraperson is her own “greatest hits” package gleaned from footage of ...