Dungen today released “Skövde,” their third new single from their forthcoming album En Är För Mycket och Tusen Aldrig Nog, due out October 7th (Mexican Summer). Named after the small Swedish town where singer/songwriter Gustav Estjes grew up, the album’s opening track expands a bright, strummy melody into a bittersweet and nostalgic atmosphere that makes it feel like a latter-day Wilco tune. “It’s about my elder brother and a bunch of friends,” explains Ejstes.

“Skövde” follows previous singles “Om Det Finns Något Som Du Vill Fråga Mig” and “Nattens Sista Strimma Ljus,” which earned praise and support from Pitchfork, NPR Music’s #NowPlaying (“scorching guitars, thunderous drums and reverb dialed to 11”), SPIN, Stereogum, Under the Radar, Brooklyn Vegan, and more.

Translated to One is Too Much and a Thousand is Never Enough, Dungen’s first proper studio album since 2015’s Allas Sak finds the core band of Ejstes, Reine Fiske, Mattias Gustavsson, and Johan Holmegard now decades-deep in collaborative focus and elevating their trailblazing psychedelia to new heights. The nine-track album was recorded in pieces beginning in 2017 in Gothenburg, Sweden, with producer Mattias Glavå, who last worked with Ejstes on Allas Sak. Glavå’s creative input was crucial to the record, and helped Ejstes to challenge his preconceptions of how his own music might sound. “We’d be in his studio, where he has all this amazing gear, and he’d be encouraging me to go with every weird idea and not to feel any pressure,” Ejstes says. “He would say, ‘Let’s use this rhythm box or this sample or this loop,’ and I’d be like, ‘can we do that on a Dungen record?’” Likewise, Ejstes’ bandmates—guitarist Fiske and bassist Gustavsson, in addition to drummer Holmegard—encouraged him to push his ideas further. “It really took a lot of courage to go to the guys and play this stuff for them,” he says.

Since breaking out with Ta det lugnt, Gustav Ejstes has used Dungen as a way to chase down and take apart the music that he finds interesting, whether it’s Scandinavian folk, freak-fried acid rock, jazz, or jungle. That sense of constant movement, of itching to see where else he can go, has meant regularly pushing himself through new incarnations of himself. “Some artists, you feel like, ‘stick to your guns, the first three albums were so much better.’ But I can’t stay in one box,” he says. On En Är För Mycket och Tusen Aldrig Nog, Ejstes finds that the wildest trips lead within.